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... Trapping

 

Trapping feral animals can be dangerous and is best left to the professionals.

A cat which is used to free ranging & fending for itself, will not understand what is happening & is very likely to become very aggressive when suddenly trapped. They are likely to suddenly lash out, hiss, spit & bite - given the chance (a cats bite - when the skin is truly punctured - can be very infectious). The confinement & veterinary checks within a rescue centre following a trapping, will most likely re-enforce any naturally defensive behaviour. The decision - dependant on the rescue centres policies - over distressed animals physical condition, welfare, human health & safety may then come into play with regards to euthanasia

It is by far a better situation - if it is possible, to slowly build up a feline/human relationship & trust with feral/stray animals before they are caught. A trap is used only when there is no better option & or a cat can not be encouraged into a carrier.

CAUTION! Cats may panic and become aggressive when they are unexpectedly closed into carriers, & many carriers sold on the market will break open to a desperate animal. This will destroy any relationship you have worked on building so be sure that your carrier is secure.

Cats cought in traps should not be left for long, the space inside is cramped, will cause great stress & cats may panic &/or hurt themselves attempting to get free.

 

Contact your local animal rescue charities for help, guidance & information.

 

In order to successfully & safely trap a feral or stray cat that resists human contact, it is important to create a regular feeding routine.

This enables more effective co-ordination with regard to the collection or delivery of the animal to a rescue charity. It requires observation, in order to identify or build a pattern of behaviour, a lot of patience & time. The amount of time & effort required when trying to catch a loose animal, depends on the nature of the particular individual.

Some ferals will distrust the metalic object that is a trap, others won't think twice about heading straight for the bait.

The cat should learn to trust your presence and the food you leave, but it may also need to learn to trust an unprimed trap.

Eventually when the timing is right, the bait food can be placed inside a primed trap and the cat will be safely secured and transported to a clinic for an assesment.

 

 

Feral & stray cats may avoid human contact

Feral & stray cats may avoid human contact

Life is tough out there for feral animals, they require neutering to prevent population growth & are often in poor condition

Life is tough out there for feral animals, they require neutering to prevent population growth & are often in poor condition

With observation & patience, patterns of behaviour will emerge

With observation & patience, patterns of behaviour will emerge

Routine feeding can build a human/feral relationship

Routine feeding can build a human/feral relationship

Eventually with care & coordination with a rescue centre, animals can be safely trapped

Eventually with care & coordination with a rescue centre, animals can be safely trapped

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