Chapter contents

8. WHY NEUTER & SPAY?

Most lost cats that come into rescue ceters are entire. The un-spayed & un-neutered stray cats that find their way into animal shelters, are often in a bad way.

Sexually entire animals will range much further, hormones regularly steer cats into danger & trouble. 

Other entire cats out there - ferals & strays - will fight hard for territory & resources. They are fighting for survival & will not tolerate any sexually entire intruders. Cat fights & the resulting injuries can have terrible consequences.

Neutering will not change a cat or a kittens personality & it does not prevent them from behaving naturally.

Problem behaviour is usually driven by sexual hormones. 

There are other entire male or female strays out there! It is our responsibility to prevent kittens being born & dying of starvation or disease, somewhere unnoticed outdoors.

Neutered males will have less nutritional requirements, & their diet can be reduced or simply altered to prevent weight gain if they are highly food motivated cats.

Most stray cats have happy endings once they are neutered or spayed.

Neuter or spay your cats!

Neutered males will lose the instinctual urge to proliferate their genes & to maintain a wide territory. They will have little if any interest in queens, & the chances of them going too far & getting lost or meeting with road traffic greatly reduces. They will not be as vigilant against any intruders encroaching on their (much smaller) territory as the competition will be over, injury & contracting viruses is then far less likely. They will not feel the need to spray & soil around their borders (the equivalent of cats putting up information & boundry posters) & their urine will be far less pungent. Not everyone is a cat lover & urine regularly sprayed on front doors can trigger people to act against the offending animal. Neutering removes this threat, their chances of contracting testicular cancer evaporate & they are often a far more contented & relaxed animal. 

Spayed Females will no longer go into season. This will stop them from absent mindedly wandering off, trying to find a mate & risking losing themselves or meeting with traffic. They will not yeowl (unless there is another problem - such as health or distress) & they will be a much more relaxed animal. Some believe that it is a kindness to allow a female cat one litter of kittens. The stress this causes her emmotions & her body should be taken into account, Spayed females are not driven by hormonal urges & know no different. To think of them as desiring to give birth is to think of them in human terms, they will have little if any concept of it. Although you may consider veterinary treatment to be expensive, it is cheaper than having to maintain a litter after litter of kittens. The risk of mammary cancer is also greatly reduced.

 

Many people believe that it is a kindness to allow a cat to have kittens before they are spayed or neutered, this is thinking of them on human terms. Giving birth puts great strain on the female anatomy and causes considerable stress, Entire males & females will suffer sexual frustration. They are animals that do not plan families or understand that concept, they simply act instinctively & are driven by hormones. After neutering their chemical drive will be absent & they will be more contented animals. 

Cats are often left entire due to the personal opinions of pet owners, or as the visit to the vets has been put off & put off.

It is very important to sterilise your cat, sooner rather than later!

Cats are crepascular - meaning that they are most active at dusk & in the early hours of dawn when we are generally asleep. They are also asleep for about 70% of the day, so we can be forgiven for thinking that the furry ball snoozing on the sofa doesn't go out much & hence avoids trouble. This is certainly more likely to be the case for sexually sterilised cats, but even then it is recomended that owners keep their pets indoors at night. If our dependent companions do find themselves beyond the safety we provide for them, they are faced with surviving in the real world. Not having learned any survival skills but that their food bowl will soon appear, locating food & competing with hardened ferals & other scavengers as a novice, is a tough prospect.

 

Starvin Marvin

Starvin Marvin

Morris, Monty & Matilda

Morris, Monty & Matilda

Monty caught on camera, asleep by the window

Monty caught on camera, asleep by the window

Grateful for food, but keeping a wary watch

Grateful for food, but keeping a wary watch

Cat carriers split into two halves, straw scattered inside (available as rabbit bedding in pet shops) makes great bedding. Ensure nests are sheltered from rain

Cat carriers split into two halves, straw scattered inside (available as rabbit bedding in pet shops) makes great bedding. Ensure nests are sheltered from rain

Chapter contents