Chapter contents

.. Cat Fights

 

Just like us cats argue, have disagreements & play some rough games. A real fight however, is unmistakable from play fighting or any minor disagreement. There will be no doubt in any onlookers mind.

One cat might leap at another - attempting to bite its enemy - the defender may roll backwards & try to bunny kick the asailant. The result is a rolling, screeching, noisy tumble of teeth & claws that will seperate again. With a lot of wailing, they often then stand-off-ishly size up their opponents, before repeatedly bouncing off one another. This can continue relentlessly until someone retreats or is beaten down. Usually these arguments end at some point with one cat submissively & cautiously backing away. Less usually the victor, if he feels particularly confident, may then press home his advantage & see his foe off with a chase.

These fights tend to be border conflicts or challenges between entire male tom cats over females.

 

Real cat fights can result in injury & health problems.

Painful cysts can form under the skin as a result of bite, puncture wounds. These need to be examined & treated at a veterinary clinic. Viruses can also be transfered through fighting & immediate battle wounds can vary in severity.

 

A cat with its heckles up a & a forthcoming posture, is in an attack position. They may aproach sideways in an attempt to look big - to intimidate their foe, charge or creep forward with menace.
Ears will be flattened back to protect them from slashing claws, immediately prior to an assault
Whiskers may splay forward to gain as much sensory information as possible before they too flatten against the face
Growling & wailing fore-warns of feline resolution though they may also remain silent and intensely focused on their enemy.

Breaking up a cat fight...

Stride boldly towards the fight with heavy footfalls, stop in front of them, clap your hands together loudly & stand your ground. This should be done in a swift, confident manner to surprise & seperate the animals. They should snap out of their focus in fear/surprise of the new threat which has borne down on them. They will probably then re-focus upon each other but if they aproach again, remind them you are there by clapping & putting a step forward. You could use something like a coat, blanket, board or broom if there is something to hand, but only to gently position the item in between them, to present them with a passive barrier. A carpet tile is for example ideal, as it is relatively rigid but has give for redirected claws, fragile hands can remain at distance from the friction. Cats are very visual in these circumstances, blocking their view & advances towards each other with a coat or a barrier will help greatly.

Do not try to grab or restrain the cats with hands, they are very likely to re-direct their aggression towards that new element.

Spraying them, or throwing a cup of water over the fight, is a last resort.

 

Alarm

Alarm

Heckles up

Heckles up

Fight or flight?

Fight or flight?

Frisky

Frisky

Venting anguish on soft toys can be very affective. In Oscars case, a horses head tied to string was the godfather of punch bags!

Venting anguish on soft toys can be very affective. In Oscars case, a horses head tied to string was the godfather of punch bags!

Chapter contents